This week, I’ve been reading… (weekly)

  • The Buzzfeed story is a good read, although the tone is a sometimes little starry eyed. Perhaps the journalist was hoping to defect. Anyway, I found this an interesting read, particularly the move into hard news reporting.

    tags: buzzfeed viral sharing

    • f there is a science to BuzzFeed’s content strategy, it is built on obsessive measurement
  • “Most people think of Facebook in a similar way: It’s a place to share photos of your kids. It’s a way to keep up with friends and family members. It’s a place to share a funny, viral story or LOLcat picture you’ve stumbled upon on the Web. This is not how Facebook thinks of Facebook. In Mark Zuckerberg’s mind, Facebook should be “the best personalized newspaper in the world.” He wants a design-and-content mix that plays up a wide array of “high-quality” stories and photos. The gap between these two Facebooks — the one its managers want to see, and the one its users like using today — is starting to become visible. “

    tags: facebook news social

  • tags: facebook mobile quartz

  • I love this. No matter how smart you think you’re being, Twitter will be smarter.

  • Slideshare presentation by James Whatley, a dude who absolutely knows what he’s talking about. And – of course – one of the Big Things for 2014 is disposable social.

    tags: social trends

  • “”I only use WhatsApp to communicate and send pics these days,” said Natalie West, a twentysomething financial sales associate in London. In the last few years she has used Facebook less and less because she doesn’t want “the whole world to know” what she’s doing. When people set up events and get-togethers on Facebook, West and her boyfriend tend to reply on WhatsApp instead because “it’s more personal”. For similar reasons, some 78% of teenagers and young people use mobile messengers to plan a meet-up with friends, according to research advisory firm mobileYouth.”

    tags: whatsapp social media messenger facebook

  • This made me think about a number of assumptions I have, but mostly I’ve bookmarked it because of Q’s multiple responses in the comments. He says: “The young have become creative online. Some feel in the traditional system, a lot of stories created by that traditional media was negative and stereotypical. With, no or very little good news. So, with the aid of the internet they have created an alternative, and can now be in control of their own stories and imaging, and get that to their own audiences. They can also now decide the balance or weighting of a story with a good or bad light, and the checks or control on them is via the social platforms they are serving. If the audience doesn?t like the content, it takes seconds for the content creators to be notified and contested. Of course within all of this there are online haters sitting behind keyboards that hate anything posted online. However, now the content creators are also the audience or very close to them this once again leads them to feel that they don?t need the support of traditional media, which has misshaped and wrongly defined them in the past. Also, one has to question the fact, why very few young people even read the traditional media and their journalistic stories? … If… they see media created by social platforms they respect by content creators they trust, and their friends reinforce that on social media, they will engage in conversation and might even SHARE the good news to others.” (He also tells a story about a conversation with a Guardian journalist about gangs that a) made me cringe and b) made me look at the whole way UK media report on gangs in a different way.

    tags: multimedia journalism future+of+news

  • ” In the end my dad died of dementia, but also because dying was the easiest way to treat him.” An honest and upsetting account of watching a loved one disintegrate through illness. One of the best pieces of writing I’ve read for a long time.

    tags: dementia longform+journalism

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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About Alison Gow

I'm a journalist, particularly interested in story-telling, networks and digital innovation.
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